Thursday, September 30, 2010

Yummy rojak packs a valuable lesson

MY PAPER, THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 30, 2010, PAGE A17, VIEWPOINTS
From
http://myepaper.mypaper.sg/ebook/web_php/fvbrowserjs.php?urljs=http://myepaper.mypaper.sg/ecreator/sphopf/mya300910cnd_opf_files/mya300910cnd.js&ver=Gen
By
GEOFF TAN



PHOTO: Singapore Favourite Foods – Chinese Rojak with its crispy You Tiao, tau pok, turnip, cucumber, dried squid all mixed in a big bowl of prawn paste with chopped nuts.
http://j2k3blogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/dscf3556.jpg
http://j2k3blogs.com/?p=549





PHOTO: Geoff Tan
The writer is a senior vice-president of Singapore Press Holdings’ marketing division.

MY PAPER, THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 30, 2010, PAGE A17, VIEWPOINTS



THE issue of taking pride in how we administer our craft, with special reference to food-stall owners, has been bugging me for a while.

The majority of food-stall owners tend to just go through the motion of producing the dish, be it chicken rice or fishball noodles. Nowadays, many even buy finished or nearly finished products from suppliers and mark them up to resell.

Take tau huay (beancurd), for example. When you see that the stall has no beancurd-making machine, chances are that it is getting the stuff from some mass-production facility.

What about wonton noodles? Many stalls get their char siew from a supplier. So all the hawker does is dunk the noodles in hot water and add the respective condiments.

I understand that there is a need to buy certain food components if it is not cost-effective for stalls to prepare their own.

However, to me, it all boils down to how much pride one takes in creating a highly palatablemasterpiece”, which not only tastes yummy but will also entice foodies to traverse the length of the island just to get a piece of it.

This brings me to Mr Alan Koh, who runs a rojak stall in Ghim Moh.



PHOTO: Fruit Rojak.
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_lctXUx9NVYw/Rg4ecAJmhWI/AAAAAAAABTU/Vky9Mrz-0hE/s1600/rojak.jpg
http://singapuradailyphoto.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html



While having lunch with my son at a coffee shop about six months ago, we noticed the newly opened stall and decided to give it a try. It was love at first bite! We ordered another two plates and I asked Mr Koh how he concocts such a tasty treat.

He recounted the steps he takes to create the dish, from the careful selection of fruit and vegetables at the wet market each morning, to the ingredients he uses to formulate what he calls his 6A hae-kor (prawn-paste) sauce.

Every order is made individually and, when it all comes together and that last spoonful of crushed peanut is showered over the dish, it is perfection!



PHOTO: http://www.girlandthemachine.com/Quickstart/ImageLib/Rojak.gif


Whenever I order a plate and put that first piece of you-char-kway (deep-fried dough stick) into my mouth, I can feel my taste buds being called to attention instantly. To me, this is the king of rojak – the one that beats it all!

If you agree with me that life is all about giving of your best in whatever you do, then you may want to treat yourself to a “shiok” plate of rojak at: Xiang Zhi Xiang, Block 19, #01-263, Ghim Moh Road.
By GEOFF TAN
The writer is a senior vice-president of Singapore Press Holdings’ marketing division.



PHOTO: Rojak Sotong, Rojok Buah - Yummy
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_2TEdpKPLq1Q/THz2rSjdIqI/AAAAAAAAAhk/s0ewSzShWhA/s1600/Rojak+Buah.jpg
http://akzlifestory.blogspot.com/




HELPDESK
我的字典: Wǒ de zì diǎn


Craft: 工艺 - gōng yì
Condiments: 调味品 - tiáo wèi pǐn
Palatable: 合口味的 - hé kǒu wèi de
Concocts: 烹调 - pēng tiáo




PHOTO: Singapore Favourite Foods – Chinese Rojak with its crispy You Tiao, tau pok, turnip, cucumber, dried squid all mixed in a big bowl of prawn paste with chopped nuts.
http://j2k3blogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/dscf3556.jpg
http://j2k3blogs.com/?p=549



PHOTO: Chinese Rojak with Century Eggs, sweet tasty prawn paste, and crispy you tiao
http://j2k3blogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/dscf3551.jpg
http://j2k3blogs.com/?p=549




Reference