Sunday, February 5, 2012

No Form of Success Comes without Rejection

From a blog where weekly lessons on life, love, fear, happiness, silence, meditation, yoga...are posted.
Source Website: http://lessonsfromthemonkimarried.blogspot.com/
Posted by Katherine Jenkins at 12:00 AM, Saturday, January 28, 2012



PHOTO: Rejection, Why Does It Hurt So Much?
Posted by Allan N. Schwartz, LCSW, Ph.D. Updated: Apr 30th 2009
http://www.mentalhelp.net/images/root/sociall_rejection_stockxpertcom_id3193501_jpg_.JPG
http://www.mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=29104&cn=1


On a recent interview, a kind young man asked me, “So, what’s it like never to be rejected anymore?” I laughed so hard that I couldn’t answer. Of course, I still get rejected all the time. Being an award-winning, New York Times bestselling author doesn’t mean you get to avoid rejection. It only means that different people reject you.

What I have learned is that no form of success comes without rejection, whether it is the rejection slip from your dream agent or the cute boy who falls in love with your best friend.

When I was growing up, I spent some time thinking about what success truly was. I moved from Hong Kong to New York and worked in a Chinatown sweatshop with my family when I was only five years old. For a long time, success meant simply escaping that ruthless, draining life of manual labor. Then when I was lucky enough to study at Harvard, the world opened up to me. Suddenly, I had access to some of the brightest minds in the world. I began to realize that success might mean more than simply escaping. It might mean contributing too. That was when I made the decision to become a writer.




PHOTO: "You can get a pretty bad blowout. And then get a really great success. So much that the person who rejected may even regret it. Don’t take it personal and don’t let it get to you. She doesn’t know you and you don’t know her well enough to let it impact your life. Just stick to your instincts and have fun."
Posted by The Professional Wingman, Saturday, September 20, 2008 at 9:41PM
http://www.theprofessionalwingman.com/storage/iStock_rejection3891150XSmall.jpg?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=1221961430705
http://www.theprofessionalwingman.com/blog/?currentPage=102


All along my path, I slipped and fell and got up again. When my family and I worked as hard and as fast as we could in the sweatshop, the factory owner cut our wages so that we couldn’t earn any extra money. At school, I was the awkward, badly-dressed Chinese girl and on top of everything, I was a brain too. Few girls wanted to be my friends. The boy I liked didn’t know I was alive. My first teacher didn’t care that I didn’t speak a word of English and gave me a zero on every test. There were times when I felt rejected on every front.



PHOTO: "It hurts to be left out."
http://prime.chips.jp/apple_komati/1320957811/22_1.jpg
http://blog.livedoor.jp/apple_komati/archives/51718455.html


As I became older, I learned English and became better assimilated (absorb into school environment). I was lucky enough to have a gift for school and achieved some success there, but with every step that I took, I faced new challenges and the possibility of rejection again. Do I hate rejection? Absolutely. If I could, I would incinerate every rejection letter I received. I want to curse and scream and stomp my feet like a three-year-old.



PHOTO: "There were times when I felt rejected on every front. With every step that I took, I faced new challenges and the possibility of rejection again."
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_TZ60-72xZZk/TIO_1RvHNeI/AAAAAAAADiY/_yXO_TAnELE/s1600/dead_end.jpg
http://neurodojo.blogspot.com/2010_09_01_archive.html


Then I take a deep breath. I tell myself that we all need to follow our own paths, whatever they are. I remember that I am worthwhile, even if I have just been rejected by this person or institution. I bear in mind that the world is big, and I will have another chance. This allows me to go on when I get rejected. I’ve seen that every person who succeeds in some way – whether it’s professionally or privately – has faced rejection many, many times and overcome it.



'I bear in mind that the world is big, and I will have another chance. This allows me to go on when I get rejected.'
'I bear in mind that the world is big, and I will have another chance. This allows me to go on when I get rejected.'
PHOTO:
"I bear in mind that the world is big, and I will have another chance. This allows me to go on when I get rejected."

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-adyOI2_QJFA/Ty5RtkyLXAI/AAAAAAAARAA/KA97paAskO0/s1600/ff14.jpg
http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/9/2011/05/ff14.jpg
http://kotaku.com/5803573/a-planet-without-square+enix


In fact, rejection lets me know that I’m continuing to challenge myself. If I only did things that came easily, I would stay in the safety of my comfort zone. That’s not enough for a full and satisfying life. So when it comes to rejection, I say: bring it on.


Jean Kwok immigrated from Hong Kong to Brooklyn when she was five and worked in a Chinatown clothing factory for much of her childhood. She won early admission to Harvard, where she worked as many as four jobs at a time, and graduated with honors in English and American literature, before going on to earn an MFA in fiction at Columbia.



PHOTO: Jean Kwok immigrated from Hong Kong to Brooklyn when she was five and worked in a Chinatown clothing factory for much of her childhood. She won early admission to Harvard, where she worked as many as four jobs at a time, and graduated with honors in English and American literature, before going on to earn an MFA in fiction at Columbia.
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ySCOERvXkds/TyND16S2G6I/AAAAAAAACuk/5bFvJMK--rE/s1600/Kwok_Jean%2Bby%2BSigrid%2BEstrada.jpg
http://lessonsfromthemonkimarried.blogspot.com/


Her debut novel Girl in Translation (Riverhead, 2010) became a New York Times bestseller. It has been published in 15 countries and chosen as the winner of an American Library Association Alex Award, a John Gardner Fiction Book Award finalist, a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers Pick, an Orange New Writers title, an Indie Next Pick, a Quality Paperback Book Club New Voices Award nominee and the winner of Best Cultural Book in Book Bloggers Appreciation Week 2010. It was featured in The New York Times, USA Today, Entertainment Weekly, Vogue and O, The Oprah Magazine, among others. The novel was a Blue Ribbon Pick for numerous book clubs, including Book of the Month, Doubleday and Literary Guild.



PHOTO: Girl in Translation (eBook) by Jean Kwok
Kimberly Chang has her world turned upside-down when she moves with her mother from their home in Hong Kong to New York. But their new life doesn't quite live up to their expectations - living in a vermin-ridden apartment in Brooklyn, the pair only have a sometimes working oven to keep warm. They have nothing but debt and neither of them speaks a word of English. While her mother spends her days earning two cents a garment at a sweatshop, intellectually gifted eleven-year-old Kim faces a new and trying challenge: school. Exiled by language, estranged in a new culture and weighed down by staggering poverty, Kim must learn to translate not just her language but who she is as she straddles these two very different worlds. In this powerful story, Jean Kwok spins a moving tale of hardship and triumph, of heartbreak and love, of all that's said without words and all that gets lost in translation.
http://images.contentreserve.com/ImageType-100/0290-1/%7BD7868D93-9E87-46B2-BAA7-6C925AA6EDD6%7DImg100.jpg
http://www.waterstones.com/waterstonesweb/products/jean+kwok/girl+in+translation+28ebook29/8130265/



PHOTO: Girl in Translation by Jean Kwok
Kimberly Chang and her mother move from Hong Kong to New York. A new life awaits them - making a new home in a new country. But all they can afford is a verminous, broken-windowed Brooklyn apartment. The only heating is an unreliable oven. They are deep in debt. And neither speaks one word of English. Yet there is hope. Eleven-year-old Kim goes to school. And though cut off by an alien language and culture - and forced by poverty to work nights in a sweatshop - she finds the classroom challenges liberating. In books and learning she'll be saved. But can Kim successfully turn the lost girl from Hong Kong into a happy American woman? And should she? Jean Kwok's powerful and moving tale of hardship and triumph, of heartbreak and love, speaks of all that gets lost in translation.
http://www.waterstones.com/wat/images/nbd/l/978014/104/9780141042749.jpg
http://www.waterstones.com/waterstonesweb/products/jean+kwok/girl+in+translation/8252685/


Jean lives in the Netherlands with her husband and two sons.

Posted by Katherine Jenkins at 12:00 AM, Saturday, January 28, 2012

Learn more about Jean here:
www.jeankwok.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Jean-Kwok/213583280524



PHOTO: Do I hate rejection? Absolutely. If I could, I would incinerate every rejection letter I received. I want to curse and scream and stomp my feet like a three-year-old.
http://www.partikasdb.lv/files/200912241712491835401119.jpg
http://www.partikasdb.lv/veseliga-uztura-forums/partika-un-veseliba/ar-uzturu-saistitas-saslimsanas/esanas-traucejumi/



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